Politics are inevitable in any organization. Ignore them at your own peril. You don’t have to play politics, but as a manager or leader, be intentional about how you respond to organizational politics because your responses shape your organization’s culture – and your character as a leader.

The first two segments of this series have focused on the growing need for senior care workers that will extend into 2030 and beyond. Now is the time for senior care leaders to begin planning and implementing strategies that will help them win the war for talent that has already begun and promises to persist in their industry.

Have you or one of your employees ever had the thought: “I could be a leader!” At some point in their career, most people have had the thought that they could or should be a leader. Unfortunately, being a leader is much more complex than simply having the motivation to want to lead.

The following document will walk you through several key questions designed to get you to think about whether you or one of your individual contributors want to be a leader, and if it should happen, whether you or they are ready to be a leader. It contains questions regarding traits, motives and values that when answered honestly can reflect a person’s ability to take on the role of a leader.

Moral authority. What is it and why is it part of managing to make a difference?

Wikipedia has a comparative definition of moral authority we like:

Moral authority is the capacity to convince others of how the world should be, as opposed to epistemic authority (relating to knowledge), which is the capacity to convince others of how the world is.

As Baby Boomers age, the need for senior care – and for senior care workers – will increase to unprecedented heights between now and 2030. The competition for workers will be fierce (it already is), and organizations that focus on selecting the right talent will have an edge on their competitors.

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