The movie, “What’s Eating Gilbert Grape,” starring Johnnie Depp as Gilbert and Leonardo DiCaprio as Arnie, is an excellent analogy to executive coaching. As executive coaches, it is vital to understand that to help or coach someone, one must have the precise ability to be helpful for the leader to be coached. In this movie, the oldest sibling, Gilbert, struggles to help his bedridden mother and mentally challenged younger brother, Arnie. After the father, Mr. Grape, commits suicide, Gilbert becomes the patriarch, surrounded by family members with situations beyond his control. What’s eating Gilbert mostly relates to Gilbert’s growing frustration caused by his inability to help his mother overcome her morbidly obese condition.

Getting promoted is reason to celebrate so hopefully, that’s what you do first! Then what? Let’s say this promotion involves managing people – maybe even people who used to be your peers. What can you do – starting right away – to succeed in this new role?

Act with Confidence. When in charge, take charge. Don’t act like you have something to prove. You’ve already proven it. Give direction in a matter-of-fact way. Make it clear through your conversational tone and relaxed demeanor that you expect people to follow your direction. Don’t give direction apologetically, and don’t be afraid to rock the boat by making positive changes. Good managers and leaders improve things, and improvement requires change.

Have you or one of your employees ever had the thought: “I could be a leader!” At some point in their career, most people have had the thought that they could or should be a leader. Unfortunately, being a leader is much more complex than simply having the motivation to want to lead.

The following document will walk you through several key questions designed to get you to think about whether you or one of your individual contributors want to be a leader, and if it should happen, whether you or they are ready to be a leader. It contains questions regarding traits, motives and values that when answered honestly can reflect a person’s ability to take on the role of a leader.

The first two segments of this series have focused on the growing need for senior care workers that will extend into 2030 and beyond. Now is the time for senior care leaders to begin planning and implementing strategies that will help them win the war for talent that has already begun and promises to persist in their industry.

As Baby Boomers age, the need for senior care – and for senior care workers – will increase to unprecedented heights between now and 2030. The competition for workers will be fierce (it already is), and organizations that focus on selecting the right talent will have an edge on their competitors.

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