The 80/20 rule -- you get 80% of your results from 20% of your efforts.

It’s a real thing, and almost everyone has heard about it.

But do you live it?

If you did, how much would it simplify your life?

If you make one resolution for 2018, make it this: Focus more on your 20

Here’s a scenario every leader faces from time to time: a top employee whose work is mission critical to your business comes to your office and announces his or her plan to leave. Not on vacation. Permanently. This person is a top performer whose departure would leave a significant hole in your business. What do you do?

Are you in a situation like this? Your work was exciting when you started this job, but the shine has worn off over time. You’re bored. It’s a good paying job with a good company. You like your manager and the people with whom you work. But that doesn’t make the work any less boring. Should you start looking for another job?

Changing jobs isn’t your only choice. There’s no guarantee that you won’t experience the same kind of boredom after a short time at a new job. But that doesn’t mean you should settle for boredom either. Boredom with your work should be a signal that you need to engage in some self-reflection and make some changes. Here’s what you can do:

You want to be a rising star in your company, but your meteoric rise can peter out, literally, if you get Peter Principled. The Peter Principle states that people get promoted to their level of incompetence because their promotions are based on their performance in the current role, instead of on their potential to excel in the next role.

To keep growing on a steep trajectory and avoid getting stalled out by the Peter Principle, find ways to start taking on some of the responsibilities of the next level and see how they fit with your strengths before you ask for that promotion. Here’s a checklist of things you can be doing to ‘try on’ the next level and see how it fits:

Technology recruiting is some of the most challenging work in the recruiting industry. A lot of technology candidates won’t even reply to an email or take a phone call from someone they don’t know personally. With unemployment hitting historically low rates, this challenge will only grow. Getting good technology talent in the front door is hard, and losing technology talent is expensive, with the cost of turnover estimated at 6-9 months of salary. If you’re smart, you’ll be figuring out how to keep the back door tightly closed.

SCROLL TO TOP